We Hold These Truths

Contrary to popular belief, the Bill of Rights does NOT give us any rights. Our rights do not come from government. Our rights are not given to us by our fellow man. Our rights come from our Creator. This was a founding principle of our country and seems to have been forgotten by many.

“We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their CREATOR with certain INALIENABLE rights……”

This was one of the revolutionary ideas that have propelled us into a leading role for liberty on this planet.

This is not semantics. This is the basis for many attacks on our rights and must be corrected. Take guns for instance- it is much easier for the gun grabbers to cite our 2nd Amendment rights than to say they want to infringe on our inalienable right to self defense. Instead of saying they want to restrict our God given rights, they take the position that they are merely “interpreting” a 200+ year old statement about guns. Or they say that the founders couldn’t imagine the progress we have made in firearms technology and we need “common sense” gun regulations.

Even more ludicrous is the idea that the rights given to us by the Constitution have limitations and are subject to the interpretations of some politically connected lawyers who wear black robes and sit in a fancy courtroom in Washington DC. All poppycock. The right to self defense is linked to the right to life and your unfettered ability to protect that life. Without that any other right you may possess is moot. Doesn’t matter that you have freedom of speech if you are dead. Goes for any other rights also. That is why the right to life is always listed at the top and why protecting that right is the most important.

So what does the Bill of Rights do? What is its purpose? Pretty much nothing other than to be a sentinel for the people indicating when government has exceeded its authority and is becoming tyrannical. It is a snapshot of some of our inalienable rights that government has NO authority to infringe upon. These rights we recognize have been fought for for over 900 years.

Look up the 1100 Charter of Liberties. The Magna Carte. The Petition of Right of 1628. The Glorious Revolution and the Bill of Rights of 1689. These were all seminal moments in the pursuit of liberty. Our Bill of Rights and the thought that our rights are inalienable didn’t just occur. It was however boldly trumpeted by the colonists when they declared independence and it was codified into our Constitution.

So next time you see someone saying that our 2nd Amendment right to carry guns is being attacked or that our 1st Amendment right to free speech is under assault, just remind them where our rights come from. We used to understand that our rights are inalienable and are not granted by government but are supposed to be protected by government. It boggles the mind to think that this lesson is too hard to understand or if pointed out will be disputed. Get educated. Get active. Liberty is calling and wants to know if you are for or against her. Freedom is not free and is not a spectator sport. It requires action on your part. A piece of paper will not protect your rights. Only true Americans can do that.

Join me at Constitutional Cappuccino to get plugged into a website that is all about the education Americans need to move our country back to its proper trajectory. My new book “Patriot Ammo: The Words Behind Our Flag” is also available and teaches of our founding documents and principles. The book would make a great present for anybody 16 and up.

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Constitutional Cappuccino Podcast 2: The 2nd Amendment

This is the 2nd podcast for Constitutional Cappuccino. The topic is the 2nd Amendment.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSchQoV6FzE

500 Words or Less: The Basics of the Bill of Rights

Many people realize that the Bill of Rights are the first 10 Amendments to the Constitution of the United States of America. What many do not realize about the Bill of Rights is that it was added after the Constitution was ratified. Over three years later. This little tidbit of knowledge is critical to understanding the relevance and importance of these amendments.

During the Constitutional Convention, the topic of a Bill of Rights was brought up. Some wanted a Bill of Rights and some opposed the proposition. Some argued that a Bill of Rights appeared in every state constitution and was needed for the federal Constitution. Those that opposed this idea cited that to write them down was to subject those inalienable rights to scrutiny from the government. If the government was not to infringe on the right of the press, for instance, they would need to define what the press actually was so they could make sure they didn’t infringe on their freedoms. This alarmed a majority of these men enough that they voted against including a Bill of Rights.

The Bill of Rights was introduced in the first Congress by James Madison. During the ratification debates most of the ratification delegations issued supplementary ideas they would like introduced in the first Congress. There was no authority to change the proposed Constitution, but these men had faith in the good will of their fellow men to give their thoughts a fair hearing. A majority of these notes concerned a Bill of Rights. James Madison took these notes and condensed them down to a much smaller list. This was the start of the Bill of Rights. After congressional deliberation, there were 12 Amendments transmitted to the states for approval. We all know today that 10 made the cut. We had a Bill of Rights.

Now I ask you- what rights do the Bill of Rights give us? If you said anything other than none you are incorrect. “We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal and endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights”. The Bill of Rights give us NO rights. They describe SOME of the inalienable rights that are inherent and not to be encroached by government.

The 2nd Amendment, for instance,  does not give us the right to keep and bear arms. It describes an inherent right, already possessed by the people, that shall not be infringed by government. The way this idea has been turned on its head has made the pursuit of liberty difficult.When you understand the 2nd Amendment in this true sense then you see how our government has violated our rights, not protected them. Government gives us no rights.

The people have inherent rights. SOME of these rights are listed in our Bill of Rights. The 9th Amendment is the catch all for our rights and states that even though we haven’t listed a certain right, it is the people’s, not the governments prerogative to claim it. The 10th Amendment further secures this claim.

Join me at Constitutional Cappuccino to get plugged into a website that is all about the education Americans need to move our country back to its proper trajectory. My new book “Patriot Ammo: The Words Behind Our Flag” is also available and teaches of our founding documents and principles. The book would make a great present for anybody 16 and up.